Category: Mac OS X

Auto-ignore unreadable disks on macOS

I have recently built myself a Hackintosh running MacOS X El Capitan, but along side the Mac disk, I have a number of other Windows disks. Unfortunately, some of these disks have some weird and wonderful partitioning that  only Windows can understand.

As a result, whenever I boot up into my MacOS X build, I constantly get prompted with a message stating The disk you inserted was not readable by this computer with options to Initialize, Ignore or Eject.

This guide explains how to use diskejectd to avoid this message from popping up every time you boot up the machine.

Forcibly eject CD on a PowerPC-based Mac

The Apple Mac has always been a piece of equipment heavily based around design. As a result, you end up with a beautiful piece of kit, but lacking in some simple functions; one of these being an eject button on the CD drive!

I have on numerous occasions found that I have inserted a bad CD, usually a bootable CD of some sort, and then found myself unable to eject the disc. The machine often enters an unresponsive state with some horrid noises coming from the CD drive.

This guide will show you how to use Open Firmware to forcibly eject a CD on any PowerPC equipped Mac.

Mac OS X: Show Hidden Files

By default, as you'd expect from any good operating system, certain system files are hidden from the view of the user. This is often for security or simply to stop the user breaking their system by moving/editing/deleting files that they don't understand. In some cases, however, you may need to be able to view these files. In Mac OS X, we need to use the Terminal to edit some of the default properties of the Finder application to do this.

This guide will show you the steps to show these hidden files.

“In order to continue the installation, please close the following application: iTunes”

Mac OS X 10.7 Lion is finally out and so far, it seems pretty cool. There are a lot of nice new features that make a great OS even greater and it is will worth the £21 price tag!

I’ve always liked tinkering around with some basic development and creating some small apps for myself that help me do what I want to do. Usually no use to anyone else, but they help me :) The one thing that put me off trying to develop anything for Mac OS X though was that by the time I came to actually be interested in tinkering with Mac development, Apple had started charging for their Xcode aplication. It was only a small price, but considering how often I’d use it, I wasn’t prepared to purchase it unless I was serious about development. I did notice though, that since upgrading to Lion, Xcode is now free in the Apple App Store, so I jumped on the opportunity before they start charging for it again.